Borrisoleigh’s Brown Bins to become the focus of new Pilot Project

Borrisoleigh’s brown bins are to become the focus of a new pilot scheme that will raise awareness among Irish householders as to what food and organic waste should be disposed of in the brown food waste bin.

 

An estimated one third of food purchased every week in Ireland is thrown away, with half of this food waste ending up in the wrong bin. This has negative consequences for public health and the environment, as well as financially impacting the householder. 

 

The Department of Communications Climate Action and Environment has funded the pilot project that will help Borrisoleigh’s householders segregate more organic waste, and ensure food no longer ends up in the general waste bin and landfill.

 

This project is being managed by the Regional Waste Management Offices and Tipperary County Council, who are working with local waste collection companies, including Ryan Brothers and Clean Ireland, on this pilot project.

 

Simon Rooney from the company Waste to Zero will supply the caddies and stickers to Borrisoleigh households taking part in the pilot scheme funded by the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment and managed by the Regional Waste Management Offices and Tipperary County Council.

Simon Rooney from the company Waste to Zero will supply the caddies and stickers to Borrisoleigh households taking part in the pilot scheme funded by the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment and managed by the Regional Waste Management Offices and Tipperary County Council.

 

Clare Curley, Director of Services, Environment and Climate Action, Tipperary County Council said, “Residents in Borrisoleigh who have a collection service with these companies can expect to receive a householder pack, which consists of a kitchen caddy, paper liners and an information leaflet in the coming weeks. A sticker will also be placed on the General Waste Bin to help remind householders that organic or food waste should not be disposed of in the General Bin, but should be put in the Food Waste Brown Bin. All packaging must be removed from food waste before disposal.”

 

“It is important that people understand what should be put into the Food Waste Brown Bins. Food waste is all vegetable and fruit peelings, loose tea, coffee grounds, egg shells, all plate scrapings, leftover or food no longer edible, regardless whether it is cooked or uncooked. Kitchen paper towels and napkins can also be disposed of in the brown bin. Small quantities of cooking oil is also acceptableI would like to thank the people of Borrisoleigh in advance for their co-operation with the pilot project.’’ she said.

 

Pauline McDonogh, Waste Prevention Officer with the Southern Region Waste Management Office added, “In 2018, the EPA conducted a national waste characterisation survey which found that approximately 50% of household organic waste is still being disposed of in the “wrong bins”, in other words the recycling or general waste bin. 

 

“We are confident that with some reminders on our bins in the form of a sticker and easily accessible information through mywaste.ie, we can help householders reduce this figure significantly. The waste management offices are also encouraging householders who do not already have a food waste bin, to check if they are eligible for one by contacting their local waste collector.”

 

Stickers will be placed on bins in Borrisoleigh from the end of February and customers will also receive their household pack. 

 

Once collected, the food waste brown bin material is delivered from homes once a fortnight to an anaerobic digestion plant or a dedicated composting plant.

 

 

More information about food waste recycling is available from www.mywaste.ie , Tipperary County Council and local waste collectors.

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