The Asthma Society of Ireland is holding a Free Asthma Clinic in Clonmel on 6th of October

Free Asthma Clinic will offer asthma patients in Tipperary the chance to have their asthma reviewed by a specialist nurse.

  • 19% of children under 14 years of age in Tipperary have asthma.
  • 10% of people in Tipperary suffer from the condition.
  • 14% of people with asthma in Tipperary attended the Emergency Department last year, with 8% needing to be admitted to hospital.
  • 33% of people with asthma in Tipperary missed school or work last year because of their illness.
  • Asthma is a serious condition, with more than one person dying from asthma each week in Ireland.
  • The Asthma Society of Ireland’s Asthma Clinic offers patients the opportunity to have their lung function tested and to speak to a specialist nurse about their asthma.
  • All services are offered free of charge.

The Asthma Society of Ireland is holding a free Asthma Clinic in Hotel Minella, Clonmel from 1pm-4pm on 6th of October. The Asthma Clinic is open to all and there is no appointment necessary. There is no admission fee, with all services and information provided completely free of charge.

The most recent statistics from the CSO indicate that 10% of people in Tipperary have asthma. This figure is almost double that in children under the age of 14 years, with 19% of children in Tipperary suffering from the condition. Asthma is a serious condition which affects patients’ quality of life and can result in hospitalisation or, in the worst cases, death.

Attendees at the Asthma Clinic will have their asthma management reviewed, their inhaler technique checked and their lung function tested. Asthma Specialist Nurses will be on hand to answer questions and give expert advice during a confidential, one to one consultation. Topics covered on the day will include asthma advice for children and adults, allergy avoidance and what to do during an asthma attack.

The ClonmelAsthma Clinic is part of the Asthma Society of Ireland’s Asthma Clinic Programme, which has been on-going since 2008. As part of the Programme the Asthma Society is holding six Asthma Clinics throughout the country in 2012. You can find more information on the Asthma Society’s Asthma Clinic Programme, including dates and venues by visiting www.asthmasociety.ie or following us on www.facebook.com/asthmasociety

Sharon Cosgrove, CEO, of the Asthma Society said “Ireland has the 4th highest prevalence of asthma worldwide and 470,000 people in Ireland suffer with the condition. Nearly 60% of Irish asthma sufferers do not have their asthma under control and more than one person a week dies from asthma in Ireland. As part of a strategic plan to tackle this problem we are providing a national programme of Free Asthma Clinics to provide the public with the most up to date information on asthma and asthma care. This is an excellent opportunity for people with asthma or parents of children with asthma to speak directly with an asthma nurse, to learn more about their own asthma management and to avail of a variety of services free of charge.”

For further information on upcoming Asthma Clinics visit www.asthmasociety.ie or call 1850 44 54 65.

 

 

References:

₁. The Asthma Society of Ireland

 

 

About Asthma:

Asthma is an inflammatory condition that affects the airways – the small tubes that carry the air in and out of the lungs.  People with asthma have airways that are extra sensitive to substances (or triggers) which irritate them.  Common triggers include cold and flu, cigarette smoke, exercise and allergic responses to pollen, furry or feathery animals or house-dust mites.

 

When the airways come into contact with an asthma trigger, the muscle around the walls of the airways tighten so that the airways become narrower.  The lining of the airways swell and produces a sticky mucus.  As the airways narrow, it becomes difficult for the air to move in and out.  That is why people with asthma wheeze and find breathing difficult.

 

Whilst there is no cure, asthma can be controlled by avoiding ‘triggers’ and by the use of ‘reliever’ and ‘controller’ medication.  Relievers are medicines that people with asthma take immediately when asthma symptoms appear.  Controllers help calm the airways and stop them from being so sensitive.

 

Talk to your GP or asthma nurse about which treatment is most suitable for you.

 

About the Asthma Society of Ireland

The Asthma Society of Ireland is the national charity representing the more than 470,000 adults and children with asthma in Ireland.

 

We support asthma patients and their families by providing a wide rage of high quality information and education services free of charge. We raise awareness about asthma and the importance of good asthma management with patient and the wider public, and actively engage with healthcare professionals, government departments and third party organisations to keep asthma high on the agenda. The Asthma Society also supports research and innovative projects which investigate the causes and treatment of asthma.

 

The Asthma Society’s goal is to optimise asthma control for all patients through services, awareness, advocacy, research and development; enabling all patients to enjoy optimal asthma control and quality of life.

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